2moto

Innovation on 2 wheels

Norick Abe YZR-500 Replica

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The spiritual successor to the RD-350

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95Racer: 95bhp and 95kg

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Norick Abe YZR-500 Replica

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The spiritual successor to the RD-350

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YZR-500 Frame Kit

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The spiritual successor to the RD-350

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Ramair intake system

Well, it seems my updates are like the proverbial buses that only come in groups with lengthy gaps in between. It must be the chilly weather we are now having that keeps me from spending too much time in a cold garage.

In any event, I am pleased to have finally completed the required carbon fibre work a couple of weeks ago. I have to admit that had I known how much work this would require, I’d not had started it most likely. Still, I learnt lots and not least have a much greater appreciation for the people who do this professionally, and why they charge what they do for one off work.

The main features of the new air-box configuration are:

  • much larger volume (~15 litres)
  • true ram-air system with air passing directly through the head stock
  • monitoring of air-box pressure (and vacuum)
  • accommodation for ECU, PowerCommander, and exhaust gas sensor amplifier
  • tunable bell mouths for shape and length
  • reduction in weight
  • semi-structural front air scoop to carry dash-logger and upper fairing

As usual, most changes have plenty of ramifications. As such, this change required modifications to the frame, mainly in the headstock area, and a new tank. Relocating the ECU also required modifications to the wiring harness. as we were changing the headstock, we also incorporated a means to change the yoke offset. This then required a new way to mount the steering damper that now lives just above the bottom yoke. Its mounting is adjustable to account for the range of available yoke offsets.

So, what started as a means to make the most of the tuned engine with a proper air-box, turned into an almost year long project. The outcome, however, is very positive and track testing will commence in January. Let’s see which bit falls of first!

This picture shows the lower part of the air-box in place and one type of the carbon fibre bell mouths. You can also see where the ECU is now located at the upper front part of the air-box.

Here you can see the entire air-box installed with the tank still off. The top is simply joined to the bottom with black racers tape (duct tape). The bottom self-locates at the front around the air scoop and mounts to the throttle bodies via the stock mounting plate which we retained.

And lastly, a couple of pictures with the tank in place (now painted as you can see. The cover is held on with a quarter turn fastener. It certainly makes it easy to connect a laptop for data downloading and engine mapping.

You earn bonus points for knowing which other racing bike, achieving fame in the mid 90’s, had the top of the air-box exposed through the tank. I am still kicking myself for not buying one when they still could be had for only 15,000-20,000 UK Pounds about 8 years ago!